Betting the Triangle in blackjack

Last week we presented the basics of the Triangle Blackjack system, which relies on keeping track of the aces that have been played in order to determine when to increase bets.

The method is similar to "ten" based card counting systems, which tracks high and low cards.

Interestingly, since we published the basics of the Triangle system, we’ve already received responses from readers ranging from "another bogus system" and "utter nonsense" to "I’ve used it and never had a losing session in six months."

Keep in mind Triangle Blackjack is a system, not an airtight recipe for withdrawing money from the casino like it was your personal bank account. All systems are subject to fluctuation so results may vary – even Ed Thorpe, who changed the face of blackjack with his bestseller, "Beat the Dealer" in the early 1960s, had losing sessions.

To recap the basics of the Triangle system, the player should sit out or reduce bets when 75 percent of the aces have already been played.

In addition, the player increases bets when favorable conditions occur, which generally include a combination of factors such as several hands occurring without the player or dealer busting, three consecutive rounds without an ace, etc. (see last week’s article for details).

This week, we’ll describe a betting system for increasing bets, and recap the basic strategy that should be employed throughout.

Note that the system is designed to elicit higher bets when the player splits, doubles down and, hopefully, catches a natural (blackjack).

A recommended betting system doubles the bet for each favorable event, starting with one unit up to a maximum of eight betting units.

For example, after the shuffle the player would bet one unit then continue until two or more of the favorable conditions (events) occur.

When that happens, the player doubles the bet.

Win or lose, if two or more events occur, the bet is doubled again.

If only one event subsequently occurs, cut the bet in half.

If no event occurs, reduce the bet to the starting minimum.

Here is a more detailed scenario on how the bets would change.

The game starts with the player making a single unit bet.

If no favorable event occurs in the first round, the bet stays at one unit.

If one event occurs in the second round, the bet remains at one unit.

If two or more events occur in the third round, the bet increases to two units.

Similarly, if two or more events occur in the fourth round, the bet increases to four units.

If one event occurs in the fifth round, the bet drops back to two units.

If two events occur in the sixth round, the bet increases to four units.

If no events occur in the seventh round, the bet drops back to one unit.

If two or more events occur in the eighth round, the bet doubles to two units.

Now, you should be getting the picture and are well on your way to mastering Triangle Blackjack.