A close look at a rare11-spot

Nov 21, 2005 1:56 AM

What is the proper strategy for keno play if we’re working with a short bankroll, let’s talk $10? Are certain tickets better than others in this situation? With this consecution of columns we’ll attempt to answer this question.

I programmed my computer to play 10,000,000 games of keno, a million players each playing $10 worth of 11-spot tickets, and here are the results:

 

 

6 out of 11 202,192

7 out of 11 36,016

8 out of 11 4,075

9 out of 11 269

10 out of 11 13

11 out of 11 0

 

 

The average player was remunerated $7.23 for $10 played, about what we’d presume. Overall, 217,165 players won $10 or more, thus breaking even or better; 4,686 players won $100 or more, thus augmenting their bankroll by a factor of 10 or better; 282 players won a grand or better; and a lucky 13 players hit 10 grand or more.

Here are our results, as a comparison, so far:

 

 

WIN $10 $100 $1000 $10,000.00

Two 460,698 0 0 0

Four 41,001 30,523 0 0

Five 72,426 6,436 0 0

Five S 11,624 6,321 6,321 0

Six 33,135 32,147 1,289 0

Eight 38,708 25,336 1,632 46

Nine 62,403 6,186 361 4

Ten 125,784 17,614 1,405 1

Eleven 217,165 4,686 282 13

Twelve 118,472 11,194 1,014 4

Fifteen 164,519 14,205 115 0

 

 

The 11-spot is categorically better on a diminutive bankroll than the two, the four, and the five. It is not as good as the eight, the ten or the twelve, and it’s for the most part indistinguishable to the six and the fifteen.

The most interesting (and perhaps surprising) thing about the 11 spot is that it is among the best tickets at breaking even or hitting $10,000 or more, while it is not very good at hitting a C-note or a grand.

On a scale of one to five stilettoes, with five being the highest, Keno Lil rates the 11-spot on a short bankroll 3 and 1/2 stilettoes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well, that’s it for now. Good luck! I’ll see you in line!