Marketers betting on catchy slogans

October 02, 2007 3:16 AM
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"Your Vegas is showing."

That’s it, the newest addition to the arsenal of marketing slogans used by the Las Vegas Convention and Visitor’s Authority.

Terry Jicinsky, the LVCVA’s senior v-p of marketing, says it was love at first sight when the creative people from R&R Partners tried it out on him.

He liked the way it speaks to a certain attitude, just like the better known, "What happens in Las Vegas stays in Las Vegas," a line that will continue to be used, according to Jicinsky.

The success of this latest addition to the line-up of marketing slogans will depend on how it is brought to life in TV ads to be aired beginning at year’s end. But it was definitely created with an eye toward tickling the same reaction processes as the "What happens here ”¦" slogan.

All the better for mounting varying versions of a party-hardy image as resort bosses constantly add new products that redefine the area’s appeal.

So what do you suppose they’ll do with the new line? It obviously suggests a certain attitude.

Maybe they could feature someone trapped in one of those dreary, draining moments, someone who suddenly responds to the urging of an inner child and leaps to a table top in response to the sounds of, perhaps, a Barry Manilow song.

Throw in a line of dancers and we may have something.

"Her name was Lola, she was a show girl ”¦"

It used to be that all Las Vegas needed was the knowledge there were casinos here. Maybe something about price, but that was before attitude became an important tool.

I wonder if Steve Wynn has ever considered dusting off some of the classics he starred in during those long ago days when he was working hard to turn the Golden Nugget into a high-roller’s dream.

Now that Donald Trump is soon to be a Wynn neighbor on the Las Vegas Strip, perhaps the two can concoct a "feud," something to draw attention to their respective properties and their very up and coming neighborhood where there is a lot of money being spent on new experiences.

Think about it.

Steve Wynn back on his roof singing, "Anything you can build, I can build better ”¦"

To which The Donald responds as he leans out a penthouse window, "I can build anything better than you ”¦"

Speaking of doing it on the roof, there was a night when the one time Sands boss, Henri Lewin, who had a marketing budget that was close to zero, and self confidence that was out of sight, hoisted a piano atop the porte cochere at the Sands and played and sang for passers-by who might have gone away thinking, What did I just see? Only in Las Vegas ”¦

Was Lewin’s Vegas showing?

Jicinsky says three ads using the new slogan have been shot. Now we’ll sit back and wait for the reports from middle America that tell of people looking a little twitchy, shaking their heads, describing themselves as "feeling a little Vegasy."

Age before beauty?

I wonder how the marketing gurus at Harrah’s really feel about an 18-year-old Norwegian girl winning the main event at the first World Series Europe which was played in London last month?

Annette Obrestad has turned 19 since playing her way through a field of more than 360 of the best no limit hold ”˜em players in the world, but that is still a couple years short of doing the company a lot of good in this country.

What they will probably do is simply focus on the fact that the World Series with its well established appeal has been taken to a place it has never been before. Generally speaking, it seemed to get good reviews.

"It was a lot of the same players you see in Las Vegas," said poker professional Lee Watkinson who spends much of his time in Las Vegas.

But the field of pros and established stars couldn’t handle Obrestad’s game.

She can gamble legally in Britain at the age of 18, but not in the U.S.

Which probably means there will not be any posters of the smiling Norwegian teen plastered around the Rio come World Series time next year. Neither will she be able to play in any of the myriad televised poker shows that feature all the biggest names. Most of the shows are filmed in Las Vegas casinos.

"What we’d like," said one of the television producers, "Is to have her doing commentary on some of the hands. We’re thinking now about how we’ll have to do that."

Poker pros who have tangled with her in Internet action say she had proven herself as a winner long before she hit the World Series Europe in London.

But it is easy to imagine World Series Commissioner Jeffrey Pollack who has brought an artist’s touch to his marketing of the World Series kicking a waste basket or two, shaking his head and mumbling to himself, "Who could have imagined?"