Security goes facial!

July 09, 2002 9:57 AM
by

share

Harrah’s Joiliet Casino is the latest hotel-­­casino to deploy the new face recognition system using Viisage Technology.

The new digital face recognition system will be used in Harrah’s Joliet’s surveillance ­­applications. It is manufactured by Bioetrica, a division of Viisage Technology.

By employing Viisage’s cutting-edge system, Harrah’s Joliet can recognize and identify known cheats, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

The technology can also be used to identify known terrorists who may be in the casino, as terrorist databases are already available for use with the Viisage face recognition system.

"We wanted to deploy the most advanced security technology available in the marketplace to prevent theft and to assure the integrity of the gaming industry," said Bill Doolin, surveillance manager at Harrah’s Joliet.

"We have an extremely strong relationship with a number of Harrah’s hotels," said Bob Schmitt, executive vice president and general manager of Biometrica at Viisage. "We are now pleased to be working with Harrah’s Joliet Casino & Hotel. Choosing to implement face recognition technology here reinforces the casino’s strong commitment to prevent the theft of potential jackpots from those who play the games fairly and to make the casino a safer environment for all patrons."

Beginning last March, Viisage has signed over a dozen contracts with casinos throughout the U.S. since its acquisition of Biometrica.

The patented face recognition technology, originally developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), uses "eigenfaces," which map characteristics of a person’s face into a multi-dimensional face space. The information is then checked against a database.

"The continued interest from the gaming industry in our digital recognition technology is a true testament to the technology’s effectiveness," Schmitt said. "Casinos worldwide are deploying it because they know it plays an important role in helping to prevent the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars each year."