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Way tickets? Yes, way!

Mar 30, 2004 1:01 AM

Even though beginning players are often intimidated by playing a way ticket, they’re really quite simple to play. Simply, the ways on a way ticket are constructed by combining the small groups on the ticket into larger combinations of groups in every way possible.

This is easy to visualize if you assign a different letter to each group and use the various letter combinations to display the various group combinations. In the following example, there are seven groups, so we will assign letters in this manner:

 

3 3 3 2 1 1 1

A B C D E F G

 

There are three possible ways to combine these groups to make an eight spot, namely 3-3-2, 3-3-1-1, and 3-2-1-1-1. Using the 3-3-2, there are three possible combinations, ABD, ACD, and BCD. Using the 3-3-1-1, there are nine possible combinations, ABEF, ABEG, ABFG, ACEF, ACEG, ACFG, BCEF, BCEG, and BCFG. Using the 3-2-1-1-1, there are three possible combinations, ADEFG, BDEFG, and CDEFG. If we count all these possible combinations that make eight, we will see that there are a total of 15 ways to make an eight spot, which would cost $7.50 to play at 50 cents per way.

There are also three possible ways to combine these groups to make a six spot, namely 3-3, 3-2-1, and 3-1-1-1. Using the 3-3, there are three possible combinations, AB, AC, and BC. Using the 3-2-1, there are nine possible combinations, ADE, ADF, ADG, BDE, BDF, BDG, CDE, CDF, and CDG. Using the 3-1-1-1, there are three possible combinations, AEFG, BEFG, and CEFG. If we count all these possible combinations, we will see that there are indeed 15 ways to make a six spot, which we could play for $7.50 at 50 cents per way.

If we choose to play the 15-way 8 and the 15-way 6 at 50 cents per way, we will therefore have a ticket with 30 total ways and a total price of $15.

Though the advent of computerized keno has made it much easier to play tickets like these, there are far fewer keno employees around who are able to explain this type of ticket to a customer.

This is not an indictment of any particular keno game, because this phenomenon is true almost anywhere in the state. Most keno employees are no longer trained to figure way tickets because the computers do it for them. Therefore they are much less knowledgeable than they once were.

Both of the keno computer systems that are on the market now have the capability of issuing sample way tickets. If you have a tricky way ticket that you want to try, ask a writer or a supervisor at the keno game to issue you an "off-line" ticket with the groups that you want to experiment with.

An off-line ticket is just a sample ticket with all the ways calculated on it. It is free, and should be a service provided for you by the keno game where you play.

Well, that’s it for now, good luck! I’ll see you in line!