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Gaming News Briefs

Apr 6, 2004 6:46 AM

More Nuggets for casino players

The new owners of the Golden Nugget hotel/casinos in Las Vegas and Laughlin vowed to bring the Golden Age of gaming back to downtown Las Vegas.

True to their word, Tim Poster and Tom Breitling have instituted changes in the casino geared to revive the "Old Las Vegas" appeal to players.

Among the changes are higher blackjack limits, higher dice odds and fewer limits on race and sports wagers.

Beginning at the tables, players can now bet up to $15,000 per hand in the high-stakes area, and $5,000 at other blackjack tables.

The Golden Nugget is also offering 10 times odds with $60,000 maximum payouts, based on a maximum $5,000 pass line and come bet.

Sports bettors will like the Golden Nugget’s new "dime line" heading into the baseball season, as well as the match-ups for NASCAR and other sports.

There are also more money lines, totals and half-time bets, and goal and money lines for hockey.

 

Sinatra art on exhibit

Now through May 31, the Godt-Cleary Gallery at Mandalay Place (at Mandalay Bay) is hosting an exhibition of paintings and memorabilia by the late Frank Sinatra.

As a special highlight to the exhibition, there will be a presentation of works that were part of Frank and Barbara Sinatra’s personal American fine art collection. Artists represented include Walt Kuhn and Norman Rockwell.

Frank Sinatra’s art consists of paintings, which were influenced by contemporary artists of his time, including Mark Rothko, Robert Mangold and Ellsworth Kelly. Their influences are clearly seen throughout Sinatra’s repertory, with their brilliant colors and captivating shapes.

In addition to Sinatra’s paintings, a unique selection of personal memorabilia including photographs, prints and albums will be available for purchase.

 

Celebs flock to casino tattoo parlor

At the Palms, the first tattoo parlor to ever open in a casino has already drawn a celebrity roster of customers. Among the stars to visit the Hart & Huntington Tattoo Company (not all actually got tattoos!) were Eminem, Mark Wahlberg, Anna Kournikova, Tony Hawk, Jaime Pressly, Lance Bass, Chris Kirkpatrick, Joey Fatone, Dennis Rodman, Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Jeremy Shockey, Taryn Manning, Melissa Joan Hart and members of the band Good Charlotte.

Local celebrities Robin Leach and Las Vegas Mayor Oscar Goodman also visited the shop, which opened at the end of February.

The tattoo parlor has three stations. Visitors can choose from the "flash" or pre-drawn artwork on the walls, or they may customize their design to fit their own style. A private guest station is also available.

The shop has a boutique ambiance with antique leathered walls, custom sound system and plush comfortable seating.

 

GSA to exhibit at NIGA expo

The Gaming Standards Association (GSA) will exhibit at this week’s National Indian Gaming Association Trade Show and Convention (NIGA) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where it will discuss solutions to problems that have prevented Native American casinos from using all the slots and casino systems currently on the market.

Specifically, the GSA will try to address concerns over equipment’s inability to "plug-and-play." In recent years, Native American gaming has been discouraged by an inability to "plug-and-play" with different operators’ devices and systems. Fortunately, GSA is currently developing standards that will make these issues a thing of the past.

GSA’s Technical Committee recently submitted drafts of two groundbreaking standards — Best of Breed and System-to-System — to the GSA membership for review, and both of these could have tremendous positive impact on Native American gaming and gaming at large when approved.

GSA Native American members include the Seminole Tribe of Florida, Foxwoods Resort Casino and the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Business Development Authority (MBDA), and as a group, they are unified in their support of GSA in the belief that standards will benefit Native American gaming and the industry as a whole.