Poker still the topic of conversation

Nov 9, 2004 5:45 AM

Poker is the new game in town that everyone is talking about and wanting to learn how to play.

They all want to learn the talk so they can walk the walk.

Carol, I know that you have told me that your friends are talking to you about seeing poker on television and on the Internet.

One of the reasons for this very large increase in the playing of poker is of course the television shows about poker and all the Internet online poker rooms.

It is the greatest revolution of poker since the days of WWII when many of us boys were away from home with no recreation or sporting games that we could play on board the ships, airplanes and battlefields.

Many excellent poker players learned the fine art of playing poker while they were in the military during the war years.

This past year set up a new poker site, www.seniorpoker.com. It is a very low-limit poker game in which "The Seniors" and the shut-ins can play poker with us with their computers online.

If the folks want to know more about the new on line poker room, check out seniorpoker.com.

In poker we always called an onlooker a sweater, one who watches the game but does not play in the game. Sometimes we called them railbirds.

The sweaters and railbirds of the poker game were only watching a poker game and were not actually playing in the game.

Most of the time players did not like sweaters standing or sitting to close to the poker game.

The major fear of the actual players was that they suspected that the onlooker, observer, or sweater was a spy for one of the other players and would or could send him over, which is poker talk for giving information about a player’s hand to another player.

Now that poker is on TV and the talk at the office or on the job is "Did you see what that player on TV did last night?" And everyone is talking about what and how someone played a hand or how the person won a large pot with or without a good poker hand!

"Oklahoma Johnny" poker tip of the week

When you are playing hold em’ ”¦ If you hold a pair as your two personal cards, you may expect to improve the pair to three of a kind (trips) 12 percent of the time on the original flop (the first three common cards).

And if you flop a set, it will improve 33 percent with the turn card (the fourth common card) and the river (the fifth and final common card).

If you play A.T. (any two), like I do sometimes do, you may expect that you will flop a pair 32 percent of the time and that you will flop two pair 2 percent of the time. And that you will flop a set 1.4 percent of the time that you hold any two.

Until next time, remember to stay lucky!