Watch: Caesars Sportsbook’s Super Bowl Ad

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J.B. Smoove appears in Caesars Sportsbook's Super Bowl ad.

A star-studded cast appeared in the first-ever Super Bowl ad from Caesars Sportsbook on NBC’s Super Bowl 56 broadcast Sunday. 30-second spots were reportedly going for $6.5 million.

The Caesars Sportsbook ad featured comedian J.B. Smoove reprising his role as “Caesar,” Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry back as “Cleopatra,” and four members of the Manning family (Archie, Cooper, Eli, and Peyton). The 30-second spot continues Caesars Sportsbook’s popular “Caesar and Cleo” campaign.

Watch it here:

With online sports betting markets opening in Louisiana and New York early in 2022, and Arizona and other states coming on board in 2021, there has been a noticeable increase in sportsbook commercials on television, radio, and streaming services.

DraftKings also paid a reported $6.5 million for a 30-second spot on NBC’s Super Bowl broadcast.  You can watch DraftKings’ teaser spot here.

PointsBet, which doesn’t spend on large ad campaigns to the extent of its competitors, received exposure during NBC’s Super Bowl coverage from its role as the network’s official sportsbook. The PointsBet brand appeared in broadcast intros, online through NFL web properties, as a special sideline sponsor, as well as through signage in SoFi Stadium.

What Is The Cost of a Super Bowl Commercial?

The $6.5 million asking price by NBC for a 30-second spot in the Super Bowl 56 broadcast sets a record. In 2021 and 2020, CBS and Fox asked for $6 million and $5.5 million, respectively. These advertising figures are rising despite smaller audience for the event.

CBS’ broadcast of Super Bowl 55 between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Kansas City Chiefs attracted an average of 96.4 million viewers, the smallest audience for the game since 2007, according to Variety.

Last year’s Super Bowl broadcast generated approximately $545 million in in-game advertising, according to Kantar, setting a record for the NFL’s big game, which is the most-watched sporting event in the U.S. annually. Typically, the broadcast network airs 90-100 national and local spots during the Super Bowl, accounting for nearly an hour of time. Fans, many of them casual observers of football, are eager to see the advertising during the game.

For the broadcast of the first Super Bowl, in 1967, a 60-second ad cost about $75,000. During Super Bowl 18, an iconic commercial from Apple called “1984” set the creative standard for ad spots during the game. Since, many brands have used the game to launch products or to signal their entry into the big leagues of advertising. Others have spent millions only later to fail, such as Pets.com, or seen mixed reviews like Quibi, a mysterious new product that puzzled viewers with its ads in Super Bowl 54.

Super Bowl 56 saw the Los Angeles Rams beat the Cincinnati Bengals 23-20 at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, California. According to research by the American Gaming Association, more than 31 million Americans were expected to wager on the Super Bowl, with a total of $7.61 billion in bets placed.

See also: We Rank The Best Sportsbook Ads of 2021

About the Author

Dan Holmes

Writer and Contributor
Dan Holmes has written three books about sports. He previously worked for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Major League Baseball. He enjoys writing, running, and lemon bars. He lives near Lake Michigan with his daughters and usually has an orange cream soda nearby.

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